Video of the Week: Japanese Beetle swarm

July 4 is usually high time for Japanese Beetles to be problematic in the eastern United States. This week's featured video shows a Japanese Beetle trap that's just swarming with beetles.

Since I can't embed videos today for some reason, click here to see it.

JBT_zipper When I looked at the video closely, I could see that someone had taken our RESCUE! Beetle Trap and replaced the bag with a gallon Ziploc bag -- presumably to reuse it. Good news: that is no longer necessary, as our new Japanese/Oriental Beetle Trap released this year has a slide-lock bottom so the trap can be emptied and reused!

Ninja with chopsticks1 We'll leave you with our TV commercial from several years back. "Rose" thinks she has found the best way to rescue her roses from Japanese Beetles... Ninjas!

Click here to see the commercial.

July 2, 2009 in Japanese Beetles, Video | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

4 Honored for Japanese Beetle fight

Japanese_beetle_on_flower_4

Japanese Beetle, this town ain't big enough for the both of us.

That's what they said in Orem, Utah -- and it worked! Two years ago, folks there became serious about battling the spread of Japanese Beetles. Agriculture officials established a take-no-prisoner attitude toward holding off the beetle invasion in their hometown.

Four people, including the Mayor of Orem, were recently honored for their efforts to put the beetles on the run. Their efforts were so successful that only 98 beetles were found in traps this year, compared to 2100 in the previous year.

September 16, 2008 in Bugs in the news, Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

"War of the Roses": WSJ writer uses RESCUE! Beetle Traps

In this story and accompanying video (below), a Wall Street Journal garden writer shares his frustration with Japanese Beetles and experiments with different methods of controlling them.

He ends up finding a three-pack of RESCUE! Japanese Beetle Traps at Costco -- "the largest (traps) I'd ever seen" -- and has success using them despite some earlier skepticism. He even catches a "flying brown beetle" that he'd never seen before. (That's likely an Oriental Beetle -- more on them next week.)

July 26, 2008 in Gardening, Japanese Beetles, Video | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

The merits of using traps for Japanese Beetles

Now that Japanese beetle season is upon us, I occasionally read articles discouraging people from using traps to control them. "Traps attract more beetles to the area, making the problem worse," quoth the naysayers.

That's why I'm reposting an entry I wrote a few years ago, after talking with one of the foremost experts on Japanese Beetles in the U.S. Here's the post from June 2005. (Note: some of the links may be outdated.)

Japanese_beetle_on_flower While disdain for Japanese beetles is universal, opinions differ on the best way to control them. Options range from pesticides to picking them off plants by hand.

Pheromone traps, however, are the most effective non-pesticide method of combatting Japanese beetles, according to an expert on the subject.

Until his retirement in late 2004, Dr. Michael Klein was a research entomologist at the USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) lab for horticultural insect research in Wooster, Ohio since 1969. Japanese beetles are his specialty.

The ARS team is responsible for monitoring infestations and preventing the migration of the Japanese beetle westward, because of the bug's serious threat to agriculture. To keep the beetles from hitching a ride on an airplane heading from Cleveland to California, ARS uses pheromone traps to catch them at various airports around the country.

In addition, Dr. Klein uses traps to protect the prized wild rose bushes and other plants in his own back yard. He contends that "Lure traps provide a visible means of combating a Japanese beetle problem, without having a negative effect on the environment."

When I talked with Dr. Klein last year before his retirement, he addressed two common misconceptions (perpetuated by articles like this) about Japanese beetle traps:

Misconception #1: Traps lure Japanese beetles from miles around.

The facts: Most attractants lure them from no more than 100 to 200 yards, he says. The beetles, however, are strong fliers and can travel several miles, touching down at random intervals to see what's available for a meal. So the traps only lure beetles that are already in flight near the yard. (However, Dr. Klein suggests problems could occur if using traps near the edge of a golf course or other large turf area.)

Misconception #2: Traps make the problem worse by luring more beetles than they catch.

Dr. Klein says that incorrect trap placement can lead to this conclusion. If a trap is placed next to a rose bush, a large number of beetles can be lured to that area, and some may stop at the roses rather than the trap.

Dr. Klein offers these tips for using Japanese beetle traps effectively:

  • Enlist your neighbors to battle the beetles with you. Traps can be effective in your yard alone, but if you can get those bordering your yard to set traps along with you, the overall beetle numbers will be greatly reduced.
  • Trap placement is critical. Many people may misguidedly place the traps next to ornamental plants, because that's where the beetles are present and causing the damage. Traps should be used about 30 feet from desired foliage, to lure the beetles away. It is preferable to place them next to a non-flowering tree or shrub, such as a pine tree or boxwood, which is not attractive to the beetles.

Jbt_outdoor_smaller Dr. Klein used the RESCUE! Japanese Beetle Trap following our redesign of the product in 2003 and was pleased with the favorable results he received from ARS testing of the RESCUE! product.

The RESCUE! Japanese Beetle Trap is one of several traps on the market. All share the same basic modus operandi: a lure entices beetles to fly toward the trap's bright yellow panels, and upon contact, the insects fall into the attached bag or container.

One of the most notable differences between the RESCUE! Trap and the competition is the addition of an exclusive pheromone for the Oriental beetle, a turfgrass pest which is less visible because of its nighttime flight habits -- but just as destructive as its relative the Japanese beetle.

Also, the attractant cartridge in the RESCUE! Japanese Beetle Trap is engineered to have a controlled and consistent release rate of the beetle pheromones. Other traps use a wax-based attractant, which has a strong initial scent release but tapers off after a few days of being exposed to air.

The double-layer nylon catch bag of the RESCUE! Trap is welded to the yellow panels, making it sturdy and resistant to the wind. The panels themselves are taller than those of other traps, giving the beetles more surface area to hit.

Additionally, the RESCUE! attractant is positioned at the top and in the center of the yellow panels. Because the scent chemicals are heavier than air, the pheromone "hovers" around the panels. In traps where the attractant is positioned lower, the scent can hover around the outside of the bag. This increases the chance that beetles could miss the trap because they are not lured inside the bag, but rather to the outside of it.

So there you have it: the case for Japanese Beetle Traps... specifically the RESCUE! Japanese Beetle Trap!

July 8, 2008 in Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

Rescue your roses from Japanese Beetles

It's Japanese Beetle season again. I can almost hear the chomping sound on the ornamental plant leaves as we speak.

Japanese_beetle_damage_2

In case you don't want to use the JBWMD (Japanese Beetle Weapon of Mass Destruction) employed by this guy...

...Or hire ninjas to karate-chop the Japanese beetles off the petals as illustrated in the TV spot below, you can go with the smarter way to rescue your roses (and other ornamental plants): the RESCUE! Japanese Beetle Trap.

June 23, 2008 in Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Beetles barnstorming the U.S.

Japanese_beetle_damage Hold onto your hollyhocks... and most of your other ornamental plants. Japanese Beetles are chomping their way westward. They're now showing up in South Dakota.

Most of the maps found on the web -- including this map, this map and even this 2005 map -- are pretty outdated, as they all show Japanese Beetles not getting much farther than Illinois. But the past few years, even the state of Utah has reported Japanese Beetle sightings (see previous BugBlog posts on Japanese Beetles).

It's getting so bad that the USDA has issued this "Wanted" poster:

Jb_poster

These hungry munchers are on the move -- it's about time to RESCUE your roses! Some of you can also catch Oriental Beetles while you're at it!

March 25, 2008 in Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Beetles invade Utah

They're heading further West.

Japanese Beetles, long a pest of the Northeastern U.S., are being found further and further toward the West Coast. Agricultural officials are concerned, and for good reason.

Japanese Beetles are not a threat to human health -- they don't bite or sting. But they have a serious economic impact.

Says Clint Burfitt, Utah Dept. of Agriculture: "This is a serious economic pest and its a federally quarantined pest. It has over 300 species of plants as a host, and in large populations, it can destroy all of your lawn and most of your perennials."

So far, the numbers are relatively low.

For more on the Japanese Beetle sightings in Utah, read this report from ksl-tv, this report from kutv, this article from the Deseret News, this article from the front page of the Daily Herald in Central Utah, and this article from the Tooele Transcript-Bulletin.

Here's a graphic that was printed in the Deseret Morning News:

0822beetles_1

August 29, 2006 in Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

Japanese beetles heading westward

Japanese_beetles According to this article, Japanese beetles have infested all of Illinois and are showing up in Iowa.

Our Customer Service department also received several calls today about Japanese beetles in Missouri.

The USDA probably needs to update this map of the infested areas.

This is all newsworthy because of the efforts of the USDA's Agricultural Research Service to prevent the westward migration of the Japanese beetle. This document also has some good information on the subject. It mentions that nine western states in particular are designated for special protection against Japanese beetle infestation: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. (Although, they may be too late to prevent Japanese beetles in Colorado.) To help accomplish this quarantine, the USDA uses Japanese Beetle Traps at airports as a control measure.

June 20, 2005 in Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

Japanese beetles: Palisade, CO "gets it"

The town of Palisade, in western Colorado near Grand Junction, has begun their third year of mass trapping efforts to rid the area of the Japanese beetle. As part of the Colorado Department of Agriculture's Japanese Beetle Eradication Program, all landowners in Palisade are given Japanese beetle traps by the Colorado State University Cooperative Extension free of charge to place in their yard.

Orchards are a growing industry in Palisade, with the region producing produce grapes, apples, peaches, cherries and plums. Adult Japanese beetles have threatened the health of these orchards by chewing leaves between the veins, causing a 'skeletonized' effect.

Japanese beetles are also a great regulatory concern, so the state wants to ensure that shipments of its nursery goods to any other states are not restricted because of the Japanese beetle infestation.

Kudos to the town of Palisade and the CSU Extension for realizing that, as mentioned in my last post, mass trapping is an effective means of eradicating the Japanese beetle.

June 9, 2005 in Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Using traps to control Japanese beetles

Jp80022_20japanese_beetles320 I'm going to take a detour from my bat rant to focus on Japanese beetles. The hungry bugs are just starting to emerge in the Southeastern U.S. (the Northeast usually gets hit in late June/early July), and their feeding frenzy will last about two months. These beetles have a taste for over 300 varieties of ornamental plants.

While disdain for Japanese beetles is universal, opinions differ on the best way to control them. Options range from pesticides to picking them off plants by hand.

Pheromone traps, however, are the most effective non-pesticide method of combatting Japanese beetles, according to an expert on the subject.

Until his retirement in late 2004, Dr. Michael Klein was a research entomologist at the USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) lab for horticultural insect research in Wooster, Ohio since 1969. Japanese beetles are his specialty.

The ARS team is responsible for monitoring infestations and preventing the migration of the Japanese beetle westward, because of the bug's serious threat to agriculture. To keep the beetles from hitching a ride on an airplane heading from Cleveland to California, ARS uses pheromone traps to catch them at various airports around the country.

In addition, Dr. Klein uses traps to protect the prized wild rose bushes and other plants in his own back yard. He contends that "Pheromone traps provide a visible means of combating a Japanese beetle problem and have a positive effect on the environment."

When I talked with Dr. Klein last year before his retirement, he addressed two common misconceptions (perpetuated by articles like this) about Japanese beetle traps:

Misconception #1: Traps lure Japanese beetles from miles around.

Most attractants lure them from no more than 160 feet, he says. The beetles, however, are strong fliers and can travel several miles, touching down at random intervals to see what's available for a meal. So the traps only lure beetles that are already in flight near the yard.

Misconception #2: Traps make the problem worse by luring more beetles than they catch.

Dr. Klein says that incorrect trap placement can lead to this conclusion. If a trap is placed next to a rose bush, a large number of beetles can be lured to that area, and some may stop at the roses rather than the trap.

Dr. Klein offers these tips for using Japanese beetle traps effectively:

  • Enlist your neighbors to battle the beetles with you. Traps are effective in your yard alone, but if you can get those bordering your yard to set traps along with you, the overall beetle numbers will be greatly reduced.
  • Trap placement is critical. Many people may mistakenly place the traps next to the ornamental plants, because that's where the beetles are present and causing the damage. Traps should be used about 30 feet from desired foliage, to lure the beetles away. It is preferable to place them next to a non-flowering tree or shrub, such as a pine tree or boxwood, which is not attractive to the beetles.

Jbtd_outdoors_1 Dr. Klein has used the RESCUE! Japanese Beetle Trap following our redesign of the product in 2003 and the favorable results he received from ARS testing.

June 6, 2005 in Japanese Beetles | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

go to www.rescue.com