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Fall is the time for flies

Fly_2This time of year, the common house fly has an additional place to breed beyond the usual manure, compost piles, dumpsters, etc.... and that is turned-over tomato fields and vegetable gardens.

This article from TheHorse.com explains more.

Most notable quote:

"Calculated over an entire summer season, a pair of house flies could produce 191 quintillion flies, enough to cover the earth 47 feet deep, if all their progeny were to survive."

Wow. Good thing we have the RESCUE! Fly Trap to catch that progeny.

October 13, 2008 in Bugs in the news, Entomology, Flies | Permalink

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Comments

I am having a fly infestation that is unbelieveable. Can I use the disposable Rescue inside the house...I didn't read all the instructions at the store and it says to put it outside. The flies are in my house and I have 3 dogs so want to be careful??? HELP....please email me back on Monday so I can return this to the store or USE IT???
Thanks...

Posted by: Audrey Dryden | Oct 19, 2008 4:01:27 PM

So, adult houseflies live for only 2 to 4 weeks, depending on temperature. How long can an adult housefly survive in a closed room where there is no food available? That is assuming normal room temperatures.

In other words, if an adult housefly gets in and I can't catch it or swat it, how long before I can be certain it has died?

If there is no food and moisture available, I suppose that there will be no reproduction. If only small particles of food (crumbs) are around, I suppose that any eggs laid will not make it to the larval stage or that they will not last long for lack of moisture.

Can you confirm these ideas or give suggestions along these lines?

Posted by: Robert Gladson | Oct 27, 2008 8:55:04 AM

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